Premises Liability

Premises liability laws define the legal duties of property owners to protect persons who come in contact with their property. The duty of care landowners owe an individual on their property may differ by jurisdiction. Some states follow common law, where the landowner’s duty may change depending on whether the person who enters their land was a licensee, invitee or a trespasser. The level of care a landowner owes to licensees or invitees may be much higher than to an individual who is on their property without permission (trespasser). The duty owed, in other words, may be determined by the relationship between the injured person and the property owner.

Landowners Legal Duty of Care

An invitee is any person who enters the owner’s property by invitation, whether actual or implied. When the property at issue is a public place or a business, an implied invitation is often found. Under this system, property owners owe the highest duty of care to invitees. If the person was invited to the landowner’s property, the landowners have the duty to warn their guest about any dangerous conditions on their property. The owners also have a duty to inspect their property to discover any hazards, and to correct or warn of any hazards they find, to make it safe for the invitee.

If the property owner does not keep invitees safe and they are injured as a result, the injured party may have a legal claim against the property owner, if they can show that the owner was negligent. There are exceptions, however — in many instances, if there is a dangerous condition on the property that is considered obvious to a reasonable person, the property owners may not have a duty to warn their guests of this condition.

A licensee is a guest of the property owner who entered the owner’s property with permission. Similar to invitees, if the individual on the property is a licensee the landowner also has a duty to warn him or her of any unsafe conditions on the property that are known to the landowner and would not be obvious to the licensee. However, the property owners do not have a duty to inspect the property to discover any hazards, as they would with an invitee.

Alternatively, under this system property owners usually have no duty of care to trespassers, unless the owners discover the trespassers on their property and know of a dangerous condition. In these limited situations, the owner would have a duty to warn the trespasser of the dangerous condition.

In recent years, several states have moved away from the common law designations of invitee, licensee and trespasser. In these states, the landowner owes a reasonable duty of care to any person or persons on their property, no matter whether the individual was invited, had the property owner’s permission to be there or did not have permission to be on the property. These jurisdictions do not base the property owner’s liability or duty to warn on the relationship between the owner and the individual on their property. Instead, owners have a duty to keep their property reasonably safe and warn others of hazards or dangerous conditions under any circumstances.

If you or a loved one have been injured while on the property of another, it is important to speak to a personal injury lawyer in your jurisdiction. A knowledgeable attorney will be able to tell you about the laws in your state, discuss your legal options, answer any questions you have and help you determine the best course of legal action for you based on the facts of your situation.

Preparing to Meet with Your Personal Injury Attorney

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Nursing Home Injuries

In recent years, our media has highlighted nursing home injuries. It is an alarming and ongoing concern to the public. To meet this concern, state and federal laws have been passed to protect patients in healthcare facilities. Patients have specific rights that must be met by facilities and staff members. When these rights are not met and individuals are injured, they have the right to pursue compensation against those held legally responsible. Often, family members must make legal claims on behalf of their loved ones. If you or a family member has been injured, it is important to speak to an attorney to learn about your legal options and rights against nursing home abuse.

Rights of Nursing Home Residents

Residents of nursing homes or healthcare facilities are protected by state and federal laws. These laws guard patients against neglect, abuse and other mistreatment, whether physical, nonphysical or mental in nature. These safeguards are often referred to as the Patient Bill of Rights, and provide residents with basic rights to food, clothing, shelter and healthcare. Additional protections also include the right of residents to make their decisions regarding their medical treatment; the right to be fully informed and in control of their finances (unless the individual not longer has capacity to do so); the right to communicate with family members, doctors, other residents and participate in social activities of their choosing; and the right to be made aware of their facility’s administrative process and given access to that process if they so choose. Federal programs — such as Medicare — and state programs also protect residents against abuse and from the use of any physical or chemical restraint that is not deemed medically necessary. Patients have the right to their own safety. Often, if it is shown that facilities do not abide by these protections, they will not receive federal or state funding.

Parties Responsible for Nursing Home Abuse

If you or a loved one has been harmed in a nursing home, legal action may be possible. A victim of nursing home abuse may follow the facilities administrative process to file a complaint against the nursing home and/or staff members. The claim will generally be investigated by an adult protective services agency. Alternatively, an action may be filed in civil court for compensation for the injuries suffered by the victim — this is usually a negligence claim. Damages in civil court will be monetary in nature, intended to help compensate injured parties or loved ones for financial, emotional and mental losses. In serious cases, authorities may even take criminal action against the responsible parties.

In most cases, the claim against the nursing home will be for negligent treatment of the resident. Negligence claims may be against a variety of potential defendants, including nursing home employees or staff, or the facility itself. Likewise, negligence claims may differ based on the facts of the situation. Some examples may include negligent treatment of nursing home residents by staff members, negligent hiring of employees by the facility, or negligent maintenance of the facility itself. In addition, there may be criminal claims of assault or battery, or claims of exploitation — taking advantage of patients through undue influence, deception, threats or the individual’s inability to give legal consent (legal incapacity).

Contact a Personal Injury Attorney in Your Area

If you or your loved when has been injured while a patient in a nursing home or other healthcare facility, it is important to speak to a knowledgeable attorney to discuss your circumstances, answer your questions and determine the most appropriate legal options in your situation.

Preparing to Meet with Your Personal Injury Attorney

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Personal Injury Due to Animal Bites

Many people are bitten by animals every year. These injuries may be serious; aside from pain, they can cause physical and emotional suffering, infection, other medical complications — sometimes even death. The most common types of bites that we hear about are dog bites. Due to an increasing number of reported bite victims and the public’s response, most states now have “dog bite” statutes that hold the owner responsible if their pet injures someone else. Aside from dogs, these statutes may cover bites from wild animals kept as pets and animals in government parks, such as zoos. The applicable laws and possible claims may vary from state to state, so it is important to discuss your situation with a knowledgeable personal injury attorney to learn more about the legal options in your area.

Types of Animals

Domestic Pets

The majority of states have dog bite statutes. In these states, an owner is liable for damages caused by their domestic pet in public places and on their own property. In some jurisdictions, the pet owner may have a defense to liability if the victim was on their property illegally. In states that do not have such a statute, the animal owners may be held liable if they knew their pet could be dangerous to others. This would apply for states without dog bite statutes, or laws regarding other domestic pets. Knowledge that the pet could be dangerous does not mean that the animal must have attacked someone, but that the owners should have known that, based on past behavior, there was a strong likelihood that their pet could harm someone. Evidence of past behaviors can range from previous attacks on people to evidence that the owner muzzled the animal (and therefore knew of the possible danger).

Wild Animals Kept as Pets

People who keep wild animals as pets do so at their own risk. Unlike domestic animals, wild animals are regarded as unsafe and unpredictable. For this reason, in most jurisdictions, the wild animal’s owners are held liable for any injuries caused by the animal. It does not matter if the animal has never attacked a person before, shown any aggression towards people or if the animal’s owners have taken all possible precautions. A wild animal is not considered “safe” in the eyes of the law. In contrast, a minority of jurisdictions will not hold the owner liable simply because they keep a wild animal. In these states, the injured person must be able to provide the court evidence that the owner had previous knowledge of the animal’s danger to others and, therefore, was negligent in keeping the animal as a pet.

Zoo Animals

Even though animals kept at a zoo are wild animals, most jurisdictions do not hold the zoo owners liable for injuries, simply because the animals are wild. Usually the injured person must show that the owners were negligent in some way and that their negligence created the situation that caused the injury.

Defenses by the Responsible Parties

Parties held responsible in an animal bite case may vary, depending on the circumstances. The person or persons held liable may be the animal’s owner or caretaker, the landlord of the premises on which the animal was kept, or the government. To determine who is responsible the court may look at a variety of factors, including who owned the animal, who had control over the animal at the time of the incident and who had knowledge of the animal’s potential danger. Even though the possible defendants may differ, there are several common defenses to an animal bite claim. Perhaps the victim’s injury was his or her own fault — the injured party knew of the risks, acted unreasonably or aggravated the animal to attack — or perhaps the victim was trespassing at the time of the injury. The defenses used will depend on the specific circumstances surrounding the incident, the responsible parties and the jurisdiction in which the claim takes place.

Injury Compensation

The amount and type of compensation you may be awarded by the court is based on the specific circumstances surrounding your injury and the jurisdiction that you are in. Some common damages that may be awarded in animal bite cases are medical costs incurred by the injured party, future medical treatment, lost wages, loss of future earnings, pain and suffering and any other damages resulting from the incident. The types of possible damages are dependent on the facts of your case. It is important to speak to an attorney in your area to discuss the facts of your case, your legal options and to answer any questions you may have.

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Uninsured Motorist Coverage

Uninsured (or underinsured) motorist coverage is insurance provided to cover an individual who has been involved in an accident with someone that either has no insurance or does not have adequate insurance to pay for the full amount of damages suffered. Jurisdictions often require that uninsured coverage be provided as a part of all motor vehicle insurance policies.

What makes a driver uninsured or underinsured? Obviously, someone driving without any auto insurance at all would be categorized as uninsured. However, an individual may still be considered uninsured if his or her plan does not allow for full coverage of the injuries for which he or she is legally responsible. Uninsured motorist coverage is intended to protect policyholders — and their passengers — who were injured by the fault of an uninsured individual. If it can be shown that the uninsured party is not at fault, uninsured/underinsured provisions of an insurance policy will not apply and the injured party’s may not recover for their injuries under that theory.

If you or a loved one were injured in a motor vehicle accident and the at-fault driver does not have insurance, it is important to speak to a personal injury attorney in your area to answer your questions and discuss your legal options.

Persons Included in Uninsured Motorist Coverage

Uninsured or underinsured motorist coverage provisions may differ from state to state. In most jurisdictions, the covered persons may include the insurance policy holder, family members who live in the same home as the insured, passengers in the vehicle when the accident occurs, pedestrians injured by the vehicle and/or the driver of the vehicle during the accident. Other jurisdictions may have coverage exclusions regarding the policyholder’s family members, if the family members possess their own insurance policy. However, in these jurisdictions the insured’s policy may not exclude family members in certain circumstances.

Likewise, state laws may determine if employees are covered under their employer’s uninsured or underinsured policies. In some states, employees are covered by their employer’s insurance policy if they are injured in a motor vehicle accident while in the business of the employer. This may mean driving their own automobile as a part of their job or at the direction of their employer; these state laws regard the employee’s personal vehicle as engaged by the employer. However, according to other state statutes, employees injured while using their own vehicles will not be covered under their employer’s corporate insurance policy, even if the employee is driving for business purposes. The fact that the employee was using his or her own automobile excludes that employee from the definition of the insured (corporate employer) that is covered by the insurance policy. To learn more about persons included and excluded by uninsured motorist coverage insurance policies, speak to an attorney in your state about your situation and the applicable laws.

Recovery for Your Injuries

Individuals covered by an uninsured/underinsured motorist policy may be compensated for their personal injuries, not injuries to personal property. The injuries suffered and costs incurred by the injured party may differ depending on the circumstances surrounding the accident and the severity of the injuries sustained. Some examples of recovery may include reimbursement for medical costs, future healthcare treatment costs, lost wages, loss of future income, pain and suffering, loss of companionship and (in some cases) wrongful death. Damages will differ based on the injuries and the laws in your state, please speak to a personal injury attorney to learn more about recovery for your injuries.

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Personal Injury: Cruise Ship Injuries

Cruise ships have become a popular vacation choice in recent years. People want to get away from the stresses of daily life for a vacation at sea. However, even though such vacations are intended to be carefree, passengers or crewmembers may still be injured aboard a cruise ship.

Most often, the ship’s owners will be held legally responsible for any injuries that take place on their ship. Ship owners have a legal duty to protect persons on their ship from any known or likely dangers and to supply reasonably safe surroundings for ship patrons and staff. However, there are different laws and legal claims that may apply depending on the type of injury sustained, the circumstances surrounding the injury and the person who was injured.

Injured Passenger

Paying patrons aboard cruise ships may be injured in a variety of ways: a slip and fall; food poisoning due to tainted food served or prepared by cruise ship staff members; assault by another passenger or crew member; or and injury due to the action or inaction of a ship’s medical staff member. If the passenger’s injury was due to negligence, the injured party (or the injured party’s loved ones) may have a claim against the owner of the cruise ship. In order to prove negligence, the injured party must prove the elements of negligence to the court: a duty running from the responsible party to the injured passenger, a breach of that duty, and an injury caused by that breach. While this may seem complex, a personal injury attorney can help you determine whether you may have grounds to file a negligence claim for your cruise ship injury.

Crewmembers

If a crewmember was injured while working aboard a cruise ship, he or she may have a claim for damages against his or her employer — the cruise ship owner. Cruise ship staff members are protected by the Jones Act, which is a federal act that protects injured seamen and gives them a legal right to damages against their employer, if the employer’s negligence has caused their injuries. An injured crewmember must prove the same elements of negligence to the court that an injured passenger must prove. If the injured party proves these elements and the cruise ship owner is held legally responsible by the court, the employer may be liable to the injured party for compensation for the damages sustained as a result of his or her injury.

What happens if a crewmember was not injured, but actually caused an injury to a fellow crewmember or passenger? This usually occurs in the context of medical negligence or battery. In some jurisdictions, if a cruise ship staff member injured another person, the owners of the cruise ship may be held liable for their employees’ actions. In other jurisdictions, the cruise ship owners will not be held liable for the actions of crewmembers unless the injured party can show that the owner knew that the crewmember was violent or dangerous and did nothing to prevent the injury that occurred, or that the crewmember was negligently hired by the owner. Claims against the employer may differ depending on the facts of the case, applicable law and jurisdiction.

Contact an Attorney

Most personal injury lawsuits that stem from incidents that took place aboard cruise ships will rest on federal maritime law. However, there are some cases where state or foreign law may apply. The applicable law depends on the specific circumstances surrounding the injury. For this reason, it is important to seek a knowledgeable attorney to discuss your situation. An attorney will be able to answer any questions you may have, ascertain the applicable law in your case and help you determine which legal path is the most appropriate for you, based on your legal rights and the facts of your case.

Preparing to Meet with Your Personal Injury Attorney

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Catastrophic Injuries

Catastrophic injuries, although often varying greatly in type and cause, all require extensive medical treatment. An illness or physical injury may be regarded as catastrophic when it is deemed severe and critical. This does not mean that the injury or illness is permanent (although it may be), but that it may take months or even years to mend or restore the injured person to health. Often in cases of catastrophic injuries, the degree of injury may not be realized right away — the consequences stemming from the injury may be long-term, often with lifelong effects.

Catastrophic injuries may be the result of many different causes; there exists no list of certain events or accidents that can cause catastrophic injuries. Causes of injury may range from automobile accidents and medical injuries to sports-related accidents, work-related accidents, defective products or exposure to toxic substances. It is the severity of the injury that classifies it as catastrophic.

As the causes of severe injuries may vary greatly, so do the types of catastrophic injuries sustained. Catastrophic injuries may include brain injuries, spinal cord injuries and severe burns; these injuries may affect the cardiovascular system, the nervous system, the respiratory system, the immune system, the muscular system, the skeletal system or the reproductive system.

Personal Injury Litigation

If you, or a loved one, have suffered a catastrophic injury, you may be entitled to compensation for your injuries. The court may award monetary compensation for the losses you have experienced. In order for the court to award compensation, you must have a personal injury claim against the responsible party. The responsible party may be an individual, a group of individuals or even a corporation. When determining who is responsible for your injuries, you must consider the facts of your case. If you were injured in a car accident, due to medical negligence or from using a defective product, the responsible party may be the owner of the automobile, your doctor or the manufacturer of the defective product. A combination of persons may also be responsible for your injuries in a catastrophic injury case. For this reason, it is important to seek an attorney knowledgeable in personal injury litigation to discuss the facts of your case and help you determine the appropriate parties that may be legally responsible for your injuries.

After you have determined the responsible parties and entered litigation, you must prove your case to the court. The court may then award compensation for the damages you have suffered. The amount and type of damages may depend on the severity of your injury, the facts of your case and the jurisdiction in which the case takes place. Generally, you may be able to recover for lost wages, loss of future income, pain and suffering, medical costs incurred (for immediate treatment and any future treatment), loss of consortium and loss of quality of life.

Additionally, courts in some jurisdictions may award punitive damages. Punitive damages are awarded by the judge or jury in addition to compensatory damages and are intended to punish the responsible parties for their actions. Punitive damages are not available in all jurisdictions and are awarded based on the circumstances surrounding the victim’s catastrophic injury.

If you have any questions regarding a personal injury claim for damages due to a catastrophic injury, it is important to speak to a knowledgeable attorney in your area. A personal injury lawyer may answer your questions, explain your legal options and help you determine the appropriate actions for you, based on your specific factual situation.

Preparing to Meet with Your Personal Injury Attorney

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Assault and Battery

Two common types of personal injury torts are assault and battery. Battery is often confused with assault, and the two terms are often perceived as one claim. In actuality, they are two separate legal claims. An assault is an act that creates a reasonable apprehension of an imminent battery, while a battery is the intentional and unpermitted physical contact with another. Often, claims for both assault and battery are filed that stem from the same incident. However, even though the torts often occur together, it is important to understand that they are separate and distinct legal claims.

Assault

In an assault claim, the plaintiff must perceive a threat that is regarded as imminent. It is not necessary that the plaintiff actually be frightened or intimidated. The focus of the court is whether the plaintiff’s apprehension was reasonable under the circumstances. In many cases it is held that mere words are not enough to constitute an assault — there must be an accompanying overt act. Likewise, in order to recover on an assault claim, the plaintiff must establish that the defendant was capable, at the time the threat was made, of carrying it out. Therefore, in order to prove a case for assault, the plaintiff must establish that the threat of harm was imminent, that the defendant was actually capable of carrying out the threat (or the plaintiff reasonably believed he or she was actually capable) and that a reasonable person, in the plaintiff’s circumstances, would have been apprehensive.

Battery

Battery can occur where an individual — or an item in contact with that individual — is touched in an offensive manner. As opposed to assault, the plaintiff need not have been aware of the contact at the time it actually occurred. In general, two different types of contact may constitute a battery: contact that caused physical harm (for example a cut, scrape, bruise, burn, fracture or physical pain) or nonconsensual contact that did not cause physical harm. Since battery is an intentional tort, the plaintiff must prove that the defendant intended his or her conduct. The plaintiff need not prove that the defendant intended to harm the plaintiff, but only that the conduct itself was intentional and not an accident. An exception to this rule is that even in situations where consent was obtained, if the actions of the defendant move beyond the boundaries of the consent given, a battery may occur.

The discussion above deals with civil tort actions for monetary damages. Assault and battery can be the basis of criminal prosecution at a state level as well. While many aspects of criminal law focus on the rights of the criminal, recent attention has been focused on the rights of the victims of crimes, who often suffer great emotional, if not physical, injuries at the hands of the criminal. All fifty states and the federal government now have laws that protect victims. In many states, a victim is considered the person who has directly suffered the effects of the crimes committed against him or her and the victim’s immediate family members who have suffered secondary effects of the crime (such as loss of a loved one). If you, or a family member, have been a victim of a crime, you should speak with a criminal law attorney in your jurisdiction to answer your questions and help you determine the best course of legal action in your situation.

Preparing to Meet with Your Personal Injury Attorney

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Wrongful Death Actions

Wrongful death claims are actions for damages stemming from a decedent’s death due to the negligent action or omission of another. The deceased person’s surviving relatives may bring a wrongful death suit seeking monetary damages to compensate for the loss of their loved one. Family members may also bring additional claims, depending on the circumstances, for elements such as loss of companionship. Each jurisdiction has its own statute regarding wrongful death claims, and those rules may differ from state to state. For this reason, it is important to speak to an attorney in your jurisdiction who is knowledgeable in wrongful death actions to learn about the laws in your state.

Who Can be the Plaintiff in a Wrongful Death Action?

In some states, wrongful death statutes entitle the decedent’s next of kin to bring a cause of action on their own behalf as a result of damages sustained following the decedent’s death. Other state laws allow family members to bring a wrongful death claim on the decedent’s behalf. These statutes, called survival acts, preserve the rights of the decedent at the moment of his or her death and allow survivors to bring a claim based upon the decedent’s rights, including damages resulting from the actual death itself. Finally, some states recognize both types of lawsuits, but generally have a provision that limits the right of the survivors in order to prevent a double recovery under the two different theories for the same injury.

Different jurisdictions also vary in who may be a plaintiff in wrongful death or survivor actions. Generally, the primary beneficiaries of the deceased individual (spouse and children) are able to bring a claim. However, in some states, parents of the deceased who are designated as beneficiaries can be plaintiffs in the suit. In most states, if the deceased did not leave any heirs (spouse, children or parents), there is no one who could be a plaintiff in a wrongful death claim. In a few states, however, distant relatives can become plaintiffs if they were dependent upon the deceased for economic support. Some jurisdictions even allow an executor or administrator of the decedent’s estate to bring a wrongful death action on behalf of the estate. Lastly, in a minority of jurisdictions, the decedent’s domestic partner may be the plaintiff, if the state recognizes common-law marriage or same-sex marriage.

Wrongful Death Litigation

Most wrongful death actions are based on tort theory. Often, it is not necessary that the defendant’s conduct be the sole cause of the death. Even where the defendant’s negligence contributes, with other circumstances, to the decedent’s death, the defendant may be held legally liable and responsible for damages.

After the plaintiff has proven the defendant’s legal liability, he or she must establish the type and amount of damages. In some jurisdictions, the plaintiffs may be able to recover the costs of the deceased’s medical care, funeral expenses, loss of future earnings, the value of the loss of the deceased’s benefits (such as pension benefits or medical and health insurance coverage), loss of consortium and general damages. Additionally, the plaintiffs may be able to recover damages for their own pain and suffering or mental anguish, and may also be able to recover punitive damages. Punitive damages are not available in all jurisdictions and availability is determined by the fact finder (judge or jury) based on the facts of the case.

The method and manner of calculating damages in a wrongful death action can be complex. Pecuniary loss must be calculated, which may be computed according to the decedent’s life expectancy and work life expectancy. The life expectancy of the beneficiaries and, where necessary, the remaining period of minority of any beneficiaries must also be considered. In calculating the value of the plaintiff’s future loss, not only may the wages of the decedent be considered but the court may also consider the value of past contributions made by the decedent, the decedent’s familial concern, his personal habits and his spending behavior. Due to these complexities, it is important to speak with a personal injury attorney who is knowledgeable in wrongful death claims to answer any questions you may have and help you pursue the best legal options based on the facts of your case.

Preparing to Meet with Your Personal Injury Attorney

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Liability in Child Birth Cases

During childbirth, injuries may occur. Often the injuries are unavoidable, but sometimes they may have been preventable with timely action and the appropriate medical treatment. When preventable injuries are the result of medical negligence, the responsible party or parties may be held legally accountable for the injuries sustained. This may include the doctor who delivered your child, hospital staff members or the hospital itself.

Often, the doctor who was in control of the delivery will be held accountable for his or her actions and the actions of subordinates, such as nurses, residents, other doctors or other hospital staff members. Doctors are held to a professional standard of care. This means that physicians must provide the same level of care as other physicians would in the same or similar circumstances. Therefore, in a medical negligence claim against a doctor, the plaintiff — such as the parents of an injured infant — must provide the court with evidence that establishes that the doctor or other medical personnel failed to meet the medical industry’s standard of care during childbirth. Examples of failure to meet the industry standard may found in a doctor’s action or inaction, including choice of treatment, method of administering treatment, or failure to notice symptoms or warning signs. If a doctor’s medical negligence can be established to the court, the physician may be held liable for the injuries of the mother or child.

Much like physicians, hospitals may also be held accountable for failing to meet an industry standard of care. Hospitals owe patients a duty of care to provide medical treatment. If it can be shown that the hospital breached its duty of care to a patient or failed to meet an industry standard of care for such a facility, the hospital may be held liable for injuries suffered.

The hospital may also be held liable for the negligent actions of hospital employees. If it is discovered that hospital staff members are under qualified, should not have been hired due to information provided by a background check or have been inadequately supervised, the medical facility may have been negligent in their hiring practices. If this is the case, the hospital may be held liable for corporate negligence and responsible for any actions of their negligently hired employees.

If the hospital or hospital employees are found to be medically negligent and liable for the patients injuries, the court may award the plaintiff damages. Generally, the parents are awarded damages for their child’s injuries and that monetary compensation will be placed in a trust to benefit the child. Damages may be received for pain and suffering, future costs of medical treatment, mental or physical disability, loss of future income, loss of quality of life or other losses depending on the circumstances surrounding the injury. The amount of damages will also depend on the circumstances, the extent of the injuries suffered and the laws in your jurisdiction.

The parents of an injured child may be awarded damages for their own losses, such as negligent infliction of emotional distress, loss of companionship, medical costs incurred and/or wrongful death of their child. If you believe your child has suffered birth injuries due to negligence care, if is important to speak to an attorney to discuss your circumstances and help you determine what legal options may be the most appropriate for you and your child.

Preparing to Meet with Your Personal Injury Attorney

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